record exchange boise
The Record Exchange - Culture Spot

[ Search Store ]

Include Tracks

[ RSD leftovers/restocks ]

RSD leftovers/restocks

Record Store Day is over, but The Record Exchange still has dozens of titles still available, plus limited restocks and a few late arrivals.

MORE

[ pono is here! ]

pono is here!

Pono is here! The Record Exchange is now carrying the PonoPlayer, a high-resolution digital music player created with the intent of providing a higher quality digital listening experience.

MORE

[ 2014 staff picks ]

2014 staff picks

After weeks of scrutiny, Record Exchange staffers have completed their 2014 Top 10 lists, and leading up to Christmas we will be posting individual lists here on the website. Visit the store to view the lists in realtime and shop our special '14 Staff Picks display. Let the judgment begin!

VIEW STAFF LISTS HERE

[ payette brewing company ]

Basic CMYK

The Record Exchange is a proud partner with Boise's Payette Brewing Company! Enjoy Payette Brewing Company beer (and for free!) at Record Exchange events such as Record Store Day, the annual holiday Bonus Club Sale and our singer-songwriter Birthday Bash celebrations!

MORE

[ outside the heard ]

[ rx top 10 ]

rx top 10

1. Pop Songs for Elk
Hillfolk Noir
2. Coming Home
Leon Bridges
3. Edge of the Sun
Calexico
4. Before This World
James Taylor
5. Meanwhile, Back at the Lab
Slightly Stoopid
6. Untethered Moon
Built to Spill
7. Summertime 06
Vince Staples
8. Sound & Color
Alabama Shakes
9. The Monsanto Years
Neil Young
10. Freedom
Refused

[ sell us your stuff! ]

sell us your stuff!

The Record Exchange buys and trades used CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and vinyl in good condition Monday-Saturday until 9 p.m. and Sunday until 6 p.m.

MORE

[ go listen boise ]

go listen boise

Go Listen Boise is a non-profit, all-volunteer organization with the mission of fostering a vibrant and diverse musical culture in the Boise area.

MORE

[ rx amazon store ]

rx amazon store

Visit The Record Exchange's Amazon Marketplace store to shop for rare and discount CDs, vinyl, DVDs and books. Live in Boise? Order online and arrange for in-store pickup!

SHOP THE STORE

[ countdown to rsd ]

[ INFOTAINMENT ]

July 7th, 2015

STREET DATE SWITCHES TO FRIDAY, VINYL TUESDAY KEEPS SPINNING

vinyl tuesday poster reduced 475Starting this week, new releases will be available at The Record Exchange on Fridays instead of Tuesdays.

In compliance with the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI, the British-based organization that acts as a music-biz United Nations), every country’s official release date is moving to Fridays beginning July 10 to create a worldwide Global Street Date.

While the new global street date impacts us in several ways, one thing it won’t change is Vinyl Tuesday – in fact, the day will get even better. In addition to the $5 in free used vinyl you get with purchase of $25 in new vinyl, we’ll have early vinyl releases, exclusives and other fun stuff in conjunction with our friends at Record Store Day. Stay tuned!

July 7th, 2015

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS (WEEK ENDING JULY 5, 2015)

Hillfolk-Noir-Pop-Songs-For-Elk1. Pop Songs for Elk, Hillfolk Noir
2. Coming Home, Leon Bridges
3. Edge of the Sun, Calexico
4. Before This World, James Taylor
5. Meanwhile, Back at the Lab, Slightly Stoopid
6. Untethered Moon, Built to Spill
7. Summertime 06, Vince Staples
8. Sound & Color, Alabama Shakes
9. The Monsanto Years, Neil Young
10. Freedom, Refused

July 7th, 2015

SAM OUTLAW LIVE AT THE RECORD EXCHANGE TUESDAY, JULY 7 – BUY THE CD, GET A FREE TICKET TO HIS SHOW WITH DAWES AT KNITTING FACTORY!

SamOutlaw-3Sam Outlaw will perform live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St., Downtown Boise) at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 7. Outlaw is opening for Dawes at Knitting Factory later that evening and we have tickets for sale at the store. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages!

Purchase Sam Outlaw‘s new album Angeleno and get a free ticket to the Knitting Factory show while supplies last!

ABOUT SAM OUTLAW

418456505060-500The future’s bright for the young Angeleno
And an old song plays in his head
Far as he knows …

These lines from the title track of Sam Outlaw‘s debut album Angeleno could almost serve as a haiku-like artist bio. Outlaw is a southern Californian singer-songwriter steeped in the music and mythos of west coast country, absorbing the classic vibes of everything from ’60s Bakersfield honky-tonk to ’70s Laurel Canyon troubadour pop and refashioning them into a sound that’s pleasurably past, present and future tense.

“The music I play, I call ‘SoCal country,’” says Outlaw. “It’s country music but with a Southern California spirit to it. What is it about Southern California that gives it that spirit, I don’t exactly know. But there’s an idea that I like that says – every song, even happy songs, are written from a place of sadness. If there’s a special sadness to Southern California it’s that there’s an abiding shadow of loss of what used to be. But then, like with any place, you have a resilient optimism as well.”

While he explores those shadows on the title track and the elegiac “Ghost Town,” Outlaw mostly comes down on the side of the optimists through Angeleno‘s dozen tracks. Opener “Who Do You Think You Are?” breezes in with south of the border charm, all sunny melody wrapped in mariachi horns, while “I’m Not Jealous” is a honky-tonker with a smart twist on the you-done-me-wrong plot. “Love Her For A While” has the amiable lope of early ’70s Poco, “Old Fashioned” the immediacy of a touch on the cheek, and the future Saturday night anthem “Jesus Take The Wheel (And Drive Me To A Bar)” shows Outlaw has a sense of humor to match his cowboy poet nature. Throughout, producers Ry and Joachim Cooder frame the material with spare, tasteful arrangements, keeping the focus on Outlaw’s voice. And it’s a voice that indeed seems to conjure up California in the same way as Jackson Browne’s or Glenn Frey’s. Easy on the ears, open-hearted, always with an undertow of melancholy.

Outlaw’s journey west began in South Dakota – he was born Sam Morgan – with stops in the midwest before his family finally settled in San Diego. Like many artists, he got the music bug early. But he had serious restrictions on what he could listen to. “I grew up in a conservative Christian home,” he explains. “My first real communal experience with music was in church. I always loved harmonizing with other people. And even though I was technically not allowed to listen to the radio, my dad loved the Beatles. My mom loved the Beach Boys and the Everly Brothers. So we listened to oldies radio, and I think got my first sense of melody and harmony from that.”

After what he calls an “unfortunate” high school cover band (“We did almost all Oasis,” he laughs) and some early stabs at songwriting in college, Outlaw’s moment of revelation arrived via the classic country voices of Emmylou Harris and George Jones. “When I first heard them, it totally blew my mind,” he says. “I went out the next day and bought Pieces of The Sky and a George Jones compilation. It was the first time I felt like I had a real special connection with music. That’s when I started to get more serious about playing the guitar and writing.”

After switching gears from a day job in ad sales to pursue his passion, Outlaw marked the change by borrowing his mother’s maiden name for a stage moniker. “The initial impetus for using Outlaw was no more than, ‘Hey, this is a name that sounds country and it’s a family name, so why not?’” he says. “Now, with my mom having passed away and her being a really strong encouragement in my life towards music, I like using the name as a way of honoring her.”

He wasted no time doing his mom proud. A self-released EP in 2014, buzz about his live shows, slots at Stage Coach and AmericanaFest, a video on CMT. Meanwhile, as he prepared to self-produce his first-full length album, his drummer Joachim Cooder played some rough demos for his father, legendary guitarist Ry Cooder.

“When Ry expressed interest in working with me, it was just, ‘Holy shit, I can’t believe it!’” says Outlaw. “I mean, there’s no sweeter person to make a ‘country music in Southern California record about Southern California.’ He’s a master of so many genres.”

To get familiar with the material, Cooder sat in with Outlaw’s band. “Before we got in the studio, Ry had already played four shows with us. It helped him curate which members of my band would work best for the live tracking. I was thinking that we’d have five rehearsals before the studio, get everything super tight, then go in and knock it out of the park. But Ry said, ‘The band knows the songs. Let’s leave some room for life to happen when we get in there.’ I liked that he had faith in the players and the songs that we didn’t need to over-rehearse. And throughout the sessions, he was on top of every nook and cranny of the arrangements. ”

Recording in Megawatt Studios in Los Angeles, with a band that included Bo Koster (My Morning Jacket), Taylor Goldsmith (Dawes), Gabe Witcher (Punch Brothers) and Chuy Guzmán (Linda Ronstadt), Outlaw heard the album he always dreamed of coming to life. “Ninety percent of what you’re hearing is still the five of us in a room performing a song,” he says. “Ry plays on every song, electric and acoustic on the basics. And then all the overdubs he did were just insanely beautiful. He was able to make magic happen on every track.”

The resulting record has the timeless feel of those that inspired Outlaw. It is also almost defiantly non-trendy. Does he worry about fitting in with a country scene teeming with bros and Bon Jovi wannabes? “This whole debate about what country music is or isn’t, bro country versus traditional, americana versus ameripolitan, it’s all pretty boring to me,” he says. “I think I made the distinction of SoCal country because I know that people crave classification. Ultimately I think that the music will speak for itself.”

As Outlaw gears up to support Angeleno with tour dates opening for Dwight Yoakam and Clint Black (“Two of my heroes,” he says), he’s hopeful not only for his own record but a comeback of the music he loves. “I’ve made it a personal mission to remind people how great country music is,” he says. “And specifically, I want to remind them that Southern California has a really rich history with country music. Even though there hasn’t been a scene here for a long time, there has been a noticeable resurgence. If I can be involved in some kind of revival in the spirit of this music, that would make me very proud.”

July 3rd, 2015

JASON ISBELL ‘SOMETHING MORE THAN FREE’ LISTENING PARTY FRIDAY, JULY 17 – WIN A SIGNED VINYL TEST PRESSING!

jason-isbell-something-more-than-freeThe Record Exchange is celebrating the release of Jason Isbell‘s new album Something More Than Free with a listening party at 6pm Friday, July 17. We’ll have Something More Than Free available for purchase on CD and vinyl, including a limited number of indie exclusive $7.99 CDs and a special vinyl edition with a bonus slipmat!

We’ll also have an ultra-rare (only 25 available worldwide) vinyl test pressing of the album signed by Jason himself to raffle off at the event!

Something More Than Free is the follow up to Isbell’s 2013 celebrated breakthrough album Southeastern, which received overwhelming support from the press and went on to sell over 150,000 copies. Isbell was the subject of stories in outlets ranging from The New York Times Magazine and Wall Street Journal to NPR’s All Things Considered and Fresh Air with Terry Gross. Jason Isbell & The 400 Unit made multiple television appearances, including The Late Show with David Letterman, Conan and Austin City Limits. Isbell won Artist of the Year, Song of the Year (Cover Me Up) and Album of the Year at the 2014 Americana Music Awards. At David Letterman’s personal request, Jason and his wife Amanda Shires performed on one of the last episodes of The Late Show in April 2015.