record exchange boise
The Record Exchange - Culture Spot

[ Search Store ]

Include Tracks

[ 2016 staff picks ]

2016 staff picks

After weeks of scrutiny, Record Exchange staffers have completed their 2016 Top 10 lists. Visit the store to view the lists in realtime and preview our picks. Let the judgment begin!

VIEW STAFF LISTS HERE

[ payette brewing company ]

Basic CMYK

The Record Exchange is a proud partner with Boise's Payette Brewing Company! Enjoy Payette Brewing Company beer (and for free!) at Record Exchange events such as Record Store Day, the annual holiday Bonus Club Sale and select live music events!

MORE

[ go listen boise ]

go listen boise

Go Listen Boise is a non-profit, all-volunteer organization with the mission of fostering a vibrant and diverse musical culture in the Boise area.

MORE

[ rx amazon store ]

rx amazon store

Visit The Record Exchange's Amazon Marketplace store to shop for rare and discount CDs, vinyl, DVDs and books. Live in Boise? Order online and arrange for in-store pickup!

SHOP THE STORE

[ rx top 10 ]

rx top 10

1. You Want It Darker
Leonard Cohen
2. Revolution Radio
Green Day
3. 11 Short Stories of Pain and Glory
Dropkick Murphys
4. Hardwired … To Self-Destruct
Metallica
5. Awaken My Love
Childish Gambino
6. A Seat at the Table
Solange
7. Eponym
SFM-Steve Fulton Music
8. Peace Trail
Neil Young
9. Collage
The Chainsmokers
10. The Essential Leonard Cohen
Leonard Cohen

[ treefort music fest ]

treefort

The Record Exchange is a proud sponsor of the sixth annual Treefort Music Fest, taking place March 22-26 throughout Downtown Boise. Treefort 2017 5-day passes are now on sale at The Record Exchange!

MORE

[ sell us your stuff! ]

sell us your stuff!

The Record Exchange buys and trades used CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and vinyl in good condition Monday-Saturday until 9 p.m. and Sunday until 6 p.m.

MORE

[ special orders ]

special orders

Can't find it in the store? The Record Exchange does special orders!

MORE

[ INFOTAINMENT ]

September 13th, 2016

Y LA BAMBA LIVE AT THE RECORD EXCHANGE SEPT. 14 – FREE/ALL AGES!

y-la-bambaY La Bamba will perform live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St., Downtown Boise) at 6pm Wednesday, Sept. 14. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages. Y La Bamba is performing at The Olympic Venue later in the evening and we have tickets for sale at the store!

Purchase Y La Bamba’s new album Ojos Del Sol (CD or LP) at the in-store!

ABOUT Y LA BAMBA AND OJOS DEL SOL:

418457610847It’s easy to talk about an artist’s growth as a series of musical decisions: an expanding sonic palette, a change in mood or tempo, an escape from the trappings of genre. It’s harder to talk about an artist’s personal—or even spiritual—growth, because that kind of progress is hard to track. Until, that is, an album like Y La Bamba’s Ojos Del Sol comes along and screams of radical transformation on every level. The Portland act’s fourth offering is a sweeping, playful and vulnerable collection that’s ripe with both musical and personal discovery. From the intimate, contemplative verses of the Spanish-language title track to the revelations delivered over the loping beats of “Ostrich,” this is an album that’s painstakingly produced while remaining emotionally raw.

Throughout the collection, Y La Bamba frontwoman Luz Elena Mendoza returns to themes of searching and metamorphosis. On one level, this is born from the Y La Bamba frontwoman’s continuing exploration of her identity as a Mexican woman. Both of Mendoza’s parents grew up in Mexico—Luz was born in San Francisco, then brought up in a strict Catholic household in Southern Oregon. She spent her childhood summers playing in the orchards of California’s San Joaquin Valley with her cousins, and it was there that she soaked up the melodies and stories that were being told through traditional folk songs with three-part harmonies. These are sounds that remain a vital building block of the songs on Ojos Del Sol, an album which she says represents “a celebration of family and community.”

But on another level, Ojos Del Sol is about Luz’s search for shared humanity outside of her own community, and for a faith that is greater than just religion. These are themes that run throughout Y La Bamba’s body of work work—with roots in a 2003 journey to India, which found Mendoza falling ill and trading her Christianity for something broader—but there’s a maturity to Ojos Del Sol that speaks to true, lasting transformation. You can hear this on the lush “Kali,” where she sings—with wonderment rather than fear—that “to know yourself is to lose everything.” And you can hear it on the album’s epic closer, “Ulysses,” where Mendoza sings that her life is “written in sand and ash and stone.”

These are songs built to soundtrack coming to grips not just with one’s own mortality, but with the fragility of the world. This is heady, emotional fare, and “this record is about being a mother to these emotions,” Mendoza says.

Her clarity of voice is intimately tied to a renewed musical approach, which Luz attributes to a greater self-awareness that developed through recent collaborations with singer-songwriters Edna Vazquez and Lila Downs, as well as an exploration of mariachi, cumbia, and Latin pop with Calexico’s Sergio Mendoza—no relation—on a collaborative 2015 album released under the name Los Hijos De La Montaña.

Those collaborations helped Mendoza find her own voice as a more confident producer and songwriter on an album that is often a stripped-down affair. Mendoza plays guitar throughout Ojos Del Sol, and worked actively with composer Richie Greene to create a new sonic voice. Percussion from another regular Mendoza collaborator, Nick Delffs (Shaky Hands, Death Songs), is a welcome near-constant that adds depth and soul to the album. To that same end, Mendoza hand-cut stencil art pieces, which appear in Ojos Del Sol’s liner notes, to pair with each new song. All of this is presented as a cohesive offering, an entry in Y La Bamba’s ongoing musical conversation about community, about the self, and about survival.

“I am thankful for all of my hardships,” Mendoza says in the album’s liner notes. “They have guided me to find rest in my soul, time after time. Over and over again.”

September 13th, 2016

NED EVETT ‘GLASS GUITAR’ ALBUM RELEASE PARTY SEPTEMBER 15!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.) is honored to host the Ned Evett “Glass Guitar” Album Release Party at 5:30pm Thursday, Sept. 15. “Glass Guitar” will be available for purchase at the party. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages.

ABOUT NED EVETT AND ‘GLASS GUITAR’

Ned Evett is following up his acclaimed 2012 album “Treehouse” (produced by Adrian Belew) with “Glass Guitar,” an epic 12-song set of rock/Americana/blues featuring Ned’s trademark glass-necked fretless guitars. Much of the album was written by Evett touring across America, Europe and Southeast Asia promoting “Treehouse.”

“This album was written in the jungle, tested in the desert, and recorded very quickly,” Evett says.

The song subjects range from the detailed war heroes of “Greatest Generation” to the kinetic future-folk of “Robot’s Daughter.” Many of the songs, such as “Golden Gate,” the true story of Ned’s first fretless glass-necked guitar, are already fan favorites.

The basic tracks were recorded at Audio Lab Recording Studio by Steve Fulton and Pat Storey, chasing down the classic sound of 1950s-era Nashville.

“We used a lot of room mics and bleed to get that immediacy, and limited ourselves to one or two takes of each performance,” Evett says.

Overdubs for Ned’s electric glass guitars were done at Upstairs Studios, Los Angeles, with a feel intended to achieve the sound of a live band playing in the studio.

“The secret is recording two or three complete lead guitar takes per song, then choosing the best performance; more takes than that and it starts to sound too slick,” Evett says. “My East Nashville days served me well sticking to this approach, plus putting an album out yourself means you’re always watching the clock!”

Todd Chavez contributes cajon and percussion to the album.

“Todd makes his own cajons with a patented curved top, so he can hit harder without bloodying his hands. They have a big sound and he played the parts perfectly as well,” Evett says.

Evett also played the bass guitar and piano on the album.

“I like performing bass and piano parts in the studio, you can really get inside the arrangement and lock in with simple parts,” he says.

Veteran Los Angeles musician George Bernardo plays vibes, adding a layer of dreamy sophistication to “Right This Time Around.”

A second volume of “Glass Guitar” is expected out in 2017.

August 23rd, 2016

94.9 FM THE RIVER PRESENTS SILVERSUN PICKUPS LIVE AT RECORD EXCHANGE AUG. 24 – GET A VIP WRISTBAND WITH PURCHASE OF ‘BETTER NATURE’ (CD/LP)!

SSPU press194.9 FM The River presents Silversun Pickups live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St. in Downtown Boise) at 7pm Wednesday, Aug. 24. Silversun Pickups are performing at the Revolution Concert House later in the evening and we have tickets for sale at the store. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages.

VIP wristbands for priority viewing are available with purchase of Better Nature on CD or vinyl!

ABOUT SILVERSUN PICKUPS

418456740297“This album is like its own quantum universe,” says Silversun Pickups singer/guitarist Brian Aubert. “It’s kind of unstable.”

Silversun Pickups’ first new album in more than three years, Better Nature sees the Silverlake, Calif.-based band partnering once again with producer Jacknife Lee (U2, Two Door Cinema Club, Crystal Castles), with whom they so successfully collaborated on 2012’s visionary Neck of the Woods. Songs like “Friendly Fires” and “Cradle (Better Nature)” were created and crafted in Lee’s Topanga studio, the band building out organically from Aubert’s spare songwriting demos. The result is fluid and freewheeling, “oozy,” in Aubert’s words, with heavily cranked guitars, propulsive rhythms, and seemingly infinite textures.

Grammy Award-winning mix engineer Alan Moulder (My Bloody Valentine, Nine Inch Nails, Royal Blood) brings maximum sonic power to the proceedings, but at the album’s beating heart is Silversun Pickups’ remarkably intuitive interplay, as ever providing panoramic musical counterpoint to Aubert’s incisive, increasingly self-exploratory lyricism. Richer, warmer, and more evocative than anything in their prior canon, Better Nature is Silversun Pickups’ most human music thus far.

“I’ll tell you something that makes me a little nervous,” Aubert confides. “This record, I like it. Usually I’m like, well, we tried! But this one, it’s weird – we’re all digging on it.”

Silversun Pickups is among the most dynamic and creative rock bands of the modern era, hailed far and wide for their inimitable merging of ethereal melodies and pure sonic force. From the indie rock opening salvo of 2005’s Pikul EP to 2012’s far-reaching Neck of the Woods, each successive release has seen the band boldly venture into uncharted terrain, bravely pushing their imagination and ability towards new and surprising summits. Better Nature marks the debut release from Silversun Pickups’ own New Machine Recordings. The label – which takes its name from the Pikul favorite, “…All The Go Inbetweens” – allows the ever-autonomous band to fully determine its own course without any interference from on high.

“This record is as indie as it gets,” Aubert laughs. “Maybe we’re crazy, but at the end of the day, it’s really not that different than before except we have more control.”

Silversun Pickups’ first decision as label heads was to once again record with producer Jacknife Lee at his nearby Topanga studio, enabling all involved to stay close to home throughout the process.

“People always say, why don’t you guys go make a record out of town somewhere,” Aubert says, “but then when would we ever live here? This is my only chance to hang in Los Angeles. If I’m not here now, when am I ever going to see these people? We learned early on – we didn’t pay attention to our home life and came back from the road to some very broken and tattered universes. We said, right there and then, we have to figure this out, how to do this and still be people. Which is something we eventually did.”

Aubert also notes that first time collaborations are always more tentative and introductory, the second go-around allowing the participants to get looser and more inventive. Having already established a creative relationship with Neck of the Woods, Silversun Pickups and Lee were not only comfortable together, they knew what worked.

“It just moves in a way that’s so quick and easy,” Aubert says. “You have the same discussions and the same battles, but you’re friendly, you’re closer than you were before. You don’t have to explain everything, because they know.”

Aubert began writing new songs upon Silversun Pickups’ return to California after nearly two years on the road. He prepared for the new album by recording a series of extremely stripped down demos with keyboardist Joe Lester in the band’s rehearsal room, mostly wordless, others just hints of melody and sound. Silversun Pickups took those “raw bones” and “used the studio to be creative,” Aubert says, “to be improvisational. To not be too locked down.” With only the barest hint of a blueprint, the band relied on their already in-sync interactivity in order to create something fully attributable to all members.

“There’s a sound that we have that only happens when the four of us get together,” Aubert says. “We can push further and further and further because we know that at the end of the day, that’s not going to change. It’s going to be me and it’s going to be them. There’s a certain thing that’s immovable whether we like it or not.”

Where Neck of the Woods was “purposely nostalgic,” Better Nature was designed as a snapshot of Silversun Pickups smack dab at this particular moment in time.

“This all felt very current,” Aubert says. “Very right now. Everything is super-happening. We’ve been doing this awhile now and this time I wanted us to really enjoy the process, to just laugh about it, to really feel…oozy. I just wanted it to come out, without thinking about it. I just wanted to exist.”

Silversun Pickups maintained a similarly Zen approach to the sessions themselves. The band had heretofore rehearsed new songs to perfection before getting near the studio, allaying their own jitters by locking everything into muscle memory before the record button was pushed. This time, that sort of safety net was off the table.

“We never played these songs straight through, all together,” Aubert says, “but it’s even more organic in a way, because we were all creating it together. How these songs come to be is in our hands. We have the bone, how do we put some meat on this thing?”

The sessions were unstructured by design, which isn’t to say the band didn’t apply considerable forethought to the process. Aubert cites influences on the album spanning Sparklehorse to NPR’s much beloved Radiolab, the band’s goal up front to create “a non-existent thing that sounds like it really exists.”

“We wanted it to be big and bombastic,” Aubert says. “We wanted there to be weird moments – double time! Bar chords! Screaming! Monkey sounds! The guitars were going to be swelling again, there were going to be loud solos. Things needed to be coming at you.”

The band worked fast despite the lack of prep, spending a grand total of 30 days recording the album between October 2014 and the start of the new year, banging out finished track after finished track in short, sharp sessions.

“It was weird,” Aubert says. “it was as intense to make as all the others, but it was also very focused. I think we’ve learned over the years how much time we waste. Back in the day we didn’t care, but now we’re all like, let’s go in, do five solid hours, and go home. We want to live. We need to do this one thousand percent, but not only this. We don’t want to be completely absorbed by this.”

A vibrantly creative groove was established in which “no one knew who was going to be doing what at any time.” Instruments were set up and ready to go at all times, Aubert even tracked vocals sans headphones, using a multi-directional microphone to “just sing to the room.”

“As tight as the last one was,” Aubert says, “this one needed to be loose.”

Better Nature is indeed Silversun Pickups at their most supple; “Pins and Needles” is all loping riff and kinetic beats, while “Friendly Fires” slow jams as much as it slow burns. Co-written and sung by Monninger, “Circadian Rhythms (Let’s Dance)” is audaciously imagined modern pop, “the kind of song we would have tried to steer away from in the past,” Aubert says. “We had to be reminded that that was what we were going for, that we weren’t afraid of anything.”

A number of roads are first taken on Better Nature, the band allowing themselves to tackle tunes that once would have been anathema to the Silversun aesthetic. “Nightlight,” the album’s incandescent first single, is lifted aloft by a sing-along chorus unprecedented in the band’s undoubtedly hook-heavy canon.

“I remember thinking, we should not do this,” Aubert says, “But then I thought, why not? Let’s do it, who cares?”

The band’s openness informed every move, from incorporating elements from Aubert and Lester’s very lo-fi demos to switching out tried and true instrumentation with invention and remarkable spontaneity. Silversun Pickups went with the flow at all turns, letting songs shift and take new shapes as events warranted. Recording “Tapedeck” proved as much “a wild ride” as the relentlessly veering song itself.

“We were working that one and that same day, Jacknife bought a vibraphone,” Aubert says. “We said, Nikki, why don’t you learn to play it? We’ve never done that before. So Nikki goes off for an hour or two and next thing you know, she’s playing the vibraphone. Those are the moments that were never available to us before because of our own closed-in mindset, we would never have taken those opportunities before.”

Harmonious and intimate, high-flying and deeply personal, Better Nature is a revelatory manifestation of a great band entirely in touch with the muse and each other. Silversun Pickups have once again managed the tricky task of being completely contemporary while also full on forward thinking, now as ever, existing more than a few steps ahead of the curve.

“The people who are invested in us generally like the last record we made every time we put out a new one,” Aubert says. “Pikul was this really low budget EP and then with Carnavas, everyone was like, ‘whoa, this is sharp!’ Swoon came out and it was all dreamy so people went ‘well, this is no Carnavas.’ And then with Neck of the Woods, it was, ‘this is nothing like Swoon.’ We can’t wait to put this record out so people can tell us how much they liked the last one.”