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The Record Exchange - Culture Spot

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[ RSD leftovers/restocks ]

RSD leftovers/restocks

Record Store Day is over, but The Record Exchange still has dozens of titles still available, plus limited restocks and a few late arrivals.

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[ pono is here! ]

pono is here!

Pono is here! The Record Exchange is now carrying the PonoPlayer, a high-resolution digital music player created with the intent of providing a higher quality digital listening experience.

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[ 2014 staff picks ]

2014 staff picks

After weeks of scrutiny, Record Exchange staffers have completed their 2014 Top 10 lists, and leading up to Christmas we will be posting individual lists here on the website. Visit the store to view the lists in realtime and shop our special '14 Staff Picks display. Let the judgment begin!

VIEW STAFF LISTS HERE

[ payette brewing company ]

Basic CMYK

The Record Exchange is a proud partner with Boise's Payette Brewing Company! Enjoy Payette Brewing Company beer (and for free!) at Record Exchange events such as Record Store Day, the annual holiday Bonus Club Sale and our singer-songwriter Birthday Bash celebrations!

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[ outside the heard ]

[ rx top 10 ]

rx top 10

1. Something More Than Free
Jason Isbell
2. Currents
Tame Impala
3. VII: Sturm und Drang
Lamb of God
4. Coming Home
Leon Bridges
5. Gatz and Berakatz
Amuma Says No
6. Men Amongst Mountains
The Revivalists
7. Pop Songs for Elk
Hillfolk Noir
8. Blade
Ashley Monroe
9. Coma Ecliptic
Between the Buried and Me
10. Before This World
James Taylor

[ sell us your stuff! ]

sell us your stuff!

The Record Exchange buys and trades used CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and vinyl in good condition Monday-Saturday until 9 p.m. and Sunday until 6 p.m.

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[ go listen boise ]

go listen boise

Go Listen Boise is a non-profit, all-volunteer organization with the mission of fostering a vibrant and diverse musical culture in the Boise area.

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[ rx amazon store ]

rx amazon store

Visit The Record Exchange's Amazon Marketplace store to shop for rare and discount CDs, vinyl, DVDs and books. Live in Boise? Order online and arrange for in-store pickup!

SHOP THE STORE

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[ INFOTAINMENT ]

BOISE WEEKLY AND THE DUCK CLUB PRESENT OF MONTREAL PRE-PARTY WITH LA LUZ IN-STORE TUESDAY, NOV. 5; FREE PIE HOLE PIZZA, VINYL RAFFLES!

LaLuz1Boise Weekly and The Duck Club present the Of Montreal Pre-Party with La Luz at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5, at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St., Downtown Boise). La Luz will perform on the RX stage before heading across the street to open for Of Montreal’s Radio Boise Tuesday show at the El Korah Shrine — free Pie Hole pizza while it lasts, too! As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages!

We have tickets for the Shrine show here at the store and will be waiving our ticket fees on all Duck Club shows during the pre-party. Anyone who purchases Duck Club tickets at the event will be entered to win a signed Of Montreal vinyl LP or Moondoggies signed vinyl LP prize pack!

ABOUT LA LUZ

LaLuz_ItsAlive_608x608Seattle’s La Luz recorded their debut EP, Damp Face, in a small trailer on a hot August day. But barring the inevitable “no-AC-in-the-van” summer tour calamity, La Luz runs cool. Their brand of coolness isn’t about distance or affect; it’s a mood, and—sue us, but to totally rip off Zelda Fitzgerald: Something about this music vibrates to the dusky, dreamy smell of dying moons and shadows. So yeah, that kind of cool.

Still, La Luz’s live shows, more than most these days, are about connection. It’s evident that the four ridiculously talented ladies on stage are not only playing music with each other, but for each other. And they engage their audience as well. Like a proper punk band—which they are not— they give you shit for not dancing. They convey a gritty self-possession, a sense that they’ve been there and back again. And, like the expert, but seemingly effortless, surf licks and meandering bass lines that rise and fall throughout their songs, their mocking is playful and dreamy and disarming enough to get most of the crowd (and sometimes the keyboard player) dancing down the center line of a soul train.

But as any half-assed Freudian will tell you, there can be no meaningful connection without first weathering some dark and lonely times. Here comes the chilly part: What makes La Luz stand out—and stand out fast—the band has only been playing together for a year and people took notice almost immediately—is that this is a band that embodies that most elusive slant on the human condition: longing, and the fleeting relief that tags alongside deep desire.

In Spanish, La Luz means “light” and that’s the perfect thing to evoke when your songs give the illusion of veering in the opposite direction. But lift out most any lyric—which is a good excuse to give a closer listen to the delicate, four-part harmonies that are fast becoming the band’s signature—and you’ll find that the aches and pains of love and loss, of living in a world where no foothold is ever a promise—all this is delivered with a nuanced dose of perfectly timed exhilaration, like the whole thing might just be worth it in the end.

Last spring, La Luz returned to that steamy trailer park to record It’s Alive – the much-anticipated follow up to Damp Face – with their friend and engineer Johnny Goss. From the first get-psyched drum roll and eerie chords of “Sure As Spring”, the dinged-up pop gem that opens the album, the rest moves like a slow drive on a dangerous road, slinking and bending as the terrain shifts. On “What Good Am I?”, the lead vocals, and the swirl of harmonies that surround it, recall the Spartan haze of Mazzy Star’s misty-eyed super hit. Smack in the middle is the title track. “It’s Alive” is a jangly rocker with a spooky refrain, oodles of ooohs, and a marauding narrative that nails down the misty logic of the rest of the album. Two instrumentals, “Sunstroke” and “Phantom Feelings”, showcase the band’s beach jam surf chops, and fall perfectly between the chilled out heartache that surrounds them.

208 MUSIC VIDEO SHOW SCREENING AND AVTALE IN-STORE FIRST THURSDAY 10/3

208MusicVideo_FinalLogo_RGBHead to The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.) on First Thursday, Oct. 3, for the 208 Music Video Show Screening with a special performance by Avtale! The festivities kick off at 6 p.m. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages.

The fourth annual 208 Music Video Show drew submissions from dozens of Idaho musicians and directors. The winners were crowned at a First Thursday event at Neurolux in September. Part of the prize for the Judges’ Choice winner, Avtale, was a showcase 30-minute set at the RX during the Oct. 4 screening. Christopher Raymond Brown and Alex Oyler, directors of Avtale’s winning video for “Groundless”, will discuss the video and answer questions during a post-performance chat.

It’s also First Thursday, so we’ll have our regular store-wide First Thursday specials, too. Hope you can join us for this fantastic display of homegrown creativity!

i6LSUKjvf4u0bABOUT AVTALE

Avtale is an electronic music experiment formed in 2013 by Chris Raymond and Kelly Lynae. Their varied live performances explore light, sound and improvisation. Learn more at avtalemusic.com and interact with the band on Facebook and YouTube.

ABOUT THE 208 MUSIC VIDEO SHOW

In 2009, Kathy O, Lawrence B and Nancy S met in a booth at Neurolux, one of Idaho’s premier concert venues, to brainstorm an idea Kathy O had about an event to showcase music videos by Idaho bands.

Looking to foster a collaborative and supportive environment whereby bands and directors could learn together about creating music videos. And a night where the bands, fans, directors and crews could watch their work projected on a movie screen and concert venue sound system.

Initially voting was done battle-of-the-bands style, where the bands/directors turn out their supporters, audience members vote as often as they want, $1 per vote, and the winning bands are those that earn the most dollar votes. Proceeds from the minimal entry fee, door and voting dollars are split between the winning bands.

Now we ask creative professionals to sit as a panel of judges prior to the event to review the merits of each music video based on the following subjective criteria: Direction; Camera; Actors/Art/Set; Story; and Editing.

Over the years, it has become clear that most people learn about new music by videos shared with them. Music videos can help increase the exposure Idaho bands and musicians have to a wider audience through YouTube/Vimeo views, sharing on blogs and music sites as well as aiding in tour booking.

Up and coming film directors get their legs under them by working on music videos and commercials. Music videos help showcase the skills of the director in scripting, managing the process, gathering crew and equipment and final cut. Music videos become a way directors can land either larger projects or the opportunity to work with the bands they desire.

Ultimately, 208 Music Video Show celebrates and promotes Idaho’s creative forces … music and video. Two creative flavors together in one medium, like peanut butter and chocolate.

Follow the 208 Music Video Show on Facebook and YouTube!

HEY MARSEILLES IN-STORE OCTOBER 1!

hey marseillesHey Marseilles will perform live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St., Downtown Boise) at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1. The band is playing Radio Boise Tuesday at Neurolux later that evening and we have tickets for sale here at the store! As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages!

ABOUT HEY MARSEILLES

HeyMarseilles_LinesWeTraceFive miles south of downtown Seattle is the neighborhood of Columbia City—a leafy stretch of old brownstones and new condos which, according to local legend and loosely interpreted census data, boasts the most diverse zip code in America. Not far from Columbia City’s main drag, amidst a swirl of languages and colors and food and accents, sits a 100-year-old, two-story house that’s home to the world-weary, seven-piece orchestral-pop ensemble known as Hey Marseilles.

World-weary in spirit if not in practice: Hey Marseilles first won hearts across the U.S. with its 2010 debut, To Travels and Trunks, an album that reveled in the education and inspiration only globe-trotting exploration can provide. With Matt Bishop’s lyrical wayfaring abutting an instrumental palette that embraced folk tradition—accordion, strings, and horns; gypsy, Gallic, and classical—To Travels and Trunks gave musical voice to the universal longing for unfettered freedom. NPR called the record “sublime and heartfelt.”

A lot has changed in the world since 2010—that house in Columbia City, for instance. The vacillations of the economy allowed Hey Marseilles violist Jacob Anderson to acquire it in 2011; he and his younger brother, cellist and producer Sam Anderson, helped renovate it. Since then, most of the band has lived in it, and the entirety of their new album was written and recorded in it. Not surprisingly, Lines We Trace is not about going out and searching. It’s about finding you’re already where you need to be.

Make your way back home again, Bishop sings on the dusky ballad “Café Lights.” I am here still.

The 12 songs on Lines We Trace represent a band steady enough in its sound—poignant, panoramic, unreservedly gorgeous—that it can expand beyond it. The string section that hums throughout “Elegy”—quintessentially sweeping, Hey Marseilles style—shifts into finely composed abstraction for the song’s final minute. Colin Richey’s skittering rhythm on “Bright Stars Burning” is a gentle breakbeat, a sly nod to atmospheric drum ‘n’ bass. “Madrona” and the album-closing “Demian” are Hey Marseilles’ first fully instrumental songs, a pair of echo-laden piano-and-cello dirges that are simultaneously solemn and sumptuous. “Dead of Night” trots along on an almost-funky, waltzy swing and gives the album its titular lyric, trumpet triumphant as Bishop sings, The lines we trace have a thousand ends/We’ll count the ways we can’t begin/And stay in our homes, remain on our own…

Throughout, Philip Kobernik’s accordion is less pronounced than previously, Nick Ward’s guitar more so. The result is less old-world, more new school. An update. A progression. A musical analog to a line Bishop sings in “Looking Back”: If you’re looking back that’s all you’ll ever see.

Six years after Bishop first got together with Kobernik and Ward to jam at Seattle’s Gasworks Park, Hey Marseilles is an experienced band with a slew of major festivals (Bumbershoot, Sasquatch!) and a national tour under its belt. They’ve come a long way—only to find themselves back home.

Put another way, as Lines We Trace suggests, sometimes you don’t have to go far to find a meaningful experience. Sometimes the comfort of the familiar is all you need to grow.

FRIGHTENED RABBIT IN-STORE SEPT. 27; BUY THE ALBUM, GET A FREE TICKET!

frightened-rabbitFrightened Rabbit will perform live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St., Downtown Boise) at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27. The band is performing at Knitting Factory later that evening and we have tickets for sale here at the store! As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages!

Be one of the first 25 people to purchase Frightened Rabbit’s new album Pedestrian Verse and get a free ticket to the Knit show!

ABOUT FRIGHTENED RABBIT

frrbtFor Scott Hutchison, the songwriting inspiration can come from anywhere.

From a Scottish sitcom about a larky soldier who’s served in Iraq. A break-up, his own usually – a recurring theme, it seems, judging by the incisive, compelling accounts of heartache sprinkled through Frightened Rabbit’s three previous albums, Sing The Greys (2006), The Midnight Organ Fight (2008) and The Winter Of Mixed Drinks (2010). A shit family Christmas that only got worse come Boxing Day. Or from a roomful of American fans mainlining a long-lost Celtic connection while also hoovering up a powerful British indie-rock band with a folk heart and a soulful love of their heritage. Frightened Rabbit are proudly Scottish, and adored on native soil, but their songs also seem to take on greater resonance and power the further from home they travel.

Ideas might have come on any one of the ten or so US tours undertaken by the band, each bigger, noisier, rowdier, more special than the last – there aren’t many British bands who can match Frightened Rabbit, formed by this thoughtful former art student nine years ago, for the level and intensity of their American success. Or they can come via a hero peer on the Scottish music scene, in this case onetime Arab Strap dipso-poet Aidan Moffat.

Or Hutchison will take inspiration from the shortcomings he himself sees in the songs he wrote for his band’s last album.

“With ‘The Winter Of Mixed Drinks’ and what I tried to do there…” begins Frightened Rabbit’s founding member and singer, “…and the things about that I didn’t like that I wanted to make better this time… The last record was purposefully open and vague in its imagery. But I wanted to write dense poetic songs again. And that was a kick off into State Hospital.”

In early 2012, the five-piece was ready to make their fourth album. But their producer of choice wasn’t available, and Hutchison was kicking his heels. And that, too, fed into a song. “Home From War” was partly catalysed by the original pilot for ‘Gary Tank Commander,’ a Scottish comedy that has gone on to become a cult show north of the border.

“He’s a guy back from Iraq and he’s just bouncing about, he’s got nothing to do, doesn’t know what to do with his life any more. ’Cause he’s been structured and regimented for that amount of time. It’s really funny but I found it quite interesting and sad.”

Suitably inspired, and rather than sit on their hands, the band hired a house in Kingussie in the Scottish Highlands and trucked a load of instruments and studio gear up from Glasgow. They then spent three weeks writing and playing and recording and writing and playing some more.

Three songs were immediate keepers: “Home From War,” inspired by that aimless squaddie, a Pixies-meets-Coldplay giant that’s sure to become a live favourite; “Off,” an intimate, chorally atmospheric tune written in one quick afternoon; and “Wedding Gloves,” a yarn about a couple who try to rekindle love by digging out and putting on their matrimonial garb. It’s narrated by Moffat, to whom Hutchison entrusted the writing of the verses.

“He totally got what I wanted,” beams Hutchison, who finagled the ex-Arab Strap man’s involvement via a drunken, late-night email. “He said to me, ‘Right, you want me to be a sexual Yoda?’ I was like, ‘Aye, if you like!’”

Come May 2012, Frightened Rabbit’s producer was finally available. Leo Abrahams was Brian Eno’s assistant for 11 years, so on top of being a great guitar player, he’s a man well-versed in free-thinking. “He was definitely up for shaking things up, and he has plenty of soul and understanding” – all perfect qualities for the band’s new songs and fresh perspective.

A month in Monnow Valley studio in Wales did the job. The EP’s opening two songs, “State Hospital” and “Boxing Day” – the latter a mordant yet defiant account of that Yule hell – have been pulled from those sessions.

Only “State Hospital” appears on Pedestrian Verse. The bulk of the other songs “have a different atmosphere” from the remaining new songs on the EP. “I don’t know how to describe it… I mean, we did consider them all for the album, but they just didn’t work. But I was really fond of what we got out of those three weeks of creative freedom.”