record exchange boise
The Record Exchange - Culture Spot

[ Search Store ]

Include Tracks

[ countdown to rsd ]

[ 2015 staff picks ]

2015 staff picks

After weeks of scrutiny, Record Exchange staffers have completed their 2015 Top 10 lists. Visit the store to view the lists in realtime and preview our picks. Let the judgment begin!

VIEW STAFF LISTS HERE

[ sell us your stuff! ]

sell us your stuff!

The Record Exchange buys and trades used CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and vinyl in good condition Monday-Saturday until 9 p.m. and Sunday until 6 p.m.

MORE

[ rx amazon store ]

rx amazon store

Visit The Record Exchange's Amazon Marketplace store to shop for rare and discount CDs, vinyl, DVDs and books. Live in Boise? Order online and arrange for in-store pickup!

SHOP THE STORE

[ pono is here! ]

pono is here!

Pono is here! The Record Exchange is now carrying the PonoPlayer, a high-resolution digital music player created with the intent of providing a higher quality digital listening experience.

MORE

[ outside the heard ]

[ record store day 2016 ]

record store day 2016

Mark your calendars: Record Store Day 2016 is April 16 at The Record Exchange! We'll have 350+ exclusive releases, live music 20% off used music/video and more all weekend long!

MORE

[ rx top 10 ]

rx top 10

1. Rimrock Country
Idyltime
2. Purple
Baroness
3. I Still Do
Eric Clapton
4. 2
Mudcrutch
5. Coming Home
Leon Bridges
6. Love Letter for Fire
Sam Beam and Jesca Hoop
7. The Impossible Kid
Aesop Rock
8. Paging Mr. Proust
The Jayhawks
9. A Sailor’s Guide to Earth
Sturgill Simpson
10. Fallen Angels
Bob Dylan

[ payette brewing company ]

Basic CMYK

The Record Exchange is a proud partner with Boise's Payette Brewing Company! Enjoy Payette Brewing Company beer (and for free!) at Record Exchange events such as Record Store Day, the annual holiday Bonus Club Sale and our singer-songwriter Birthday Bash celebrations!

MORE

[ go listen boise ]

go listen boise

Go Listen Boise is a non-profit, all-volunteer organization with the mission of fostering a vibrant and diverse musical culture in the Boise area.

MORE

[ INFOTAINMENT ]

December 7th, 2014

CAGE THE ELEPHANT SIGNING SUNDAY, DEC. 7; VIP PRIORITY-LINE WRISTBAND AVAILABLE WITH PURCHASE DEC. 4!

CTE-White_Seamless_472_BWColin-Lane-_094.9 FM The River presents the Cage the Elephant album signing at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 7 at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.). As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages. Cage the Elephant is performing at the Revolution Concert House later that evening (7 p.m.) and we have tickets for sale at the store!

Want priority line placement at the signing? Beginning Thursday, Dec. 4, purchase Melophobia and we’ll give you a VIP line wristband! (There will be a secondary line for customers without wristbands, which will follow the VIP line.) Listen to 94.9 FM The River for a chance to win a wristband!

ABOUT CAGE THE ELEPHANT

418455626902-500MELOPHOBIA: A fear of music.

On Cage The Elephant’s third album, MELOPHOBIA, the rock band was faced with the challenge of finding cohesiveness in the ideas of five different people. After touring for nearly five years straight on their prior releases, 2008’s Cage The Elephant and 2011’s Thank You, Happy Birthday, the musicians took some time off the road, to write as individuals before getting back together in August of 2012 to begin work on MELOPHOBIA as a collective.

“As individuals we all had fairly vague visions for how we wanted the record to turn out,” lead singer Matt Shultz says. “They were pretty polar. It really became a challenge to combine all these polar opposites together in a cohesive way. We first started writing material that was very intimate and had a very kind of close and hushed sound to it, but our hearts missed that energy and swagger and playfulness we love so much. Once that came to light, the record really started taking shape on its own. It was the uniting of several different ideas that were really different from each other.”

The album, a varied collection of unabashedly vivid and notably thoughtful rock songs, was written and recorded over the course of a year, with various recording sessions taking place at St. Charles Studio in Nashville over the winter and spring with longtime producer Jay Joyce. The approach was highly experimental and based around the idea that that you don’t write a song, you find it. Along with Joyce, the band focused on bringing each track to its greatest potential, which sometimes posed a significant challenge. Throughout the process the musicians stopped listening to other musical recordings almost entirely and Matt Shultz drew songwriting inspiration from listening to those around him interact.

“I wanted the making of this music to be comparable to drawing your childhood house purely from memory,” continues Shultz. “Your mind recreates things that aren’t based so much on physical truth but more based on emotion. I can speak from my own personal experience that pride and fear are always the enemy when you’re creating. Sometimes we cater toward certain sounds or approaches or deliveries because that is what we think society at that particular time has deemed artistic and we totally lose sight of the fact that art is a form of expression. On this record, lyrically and musically, we really strived to be better communicators.”

The album’s flagship single “Come A Little Closer” is a boisterous, blues-laden rocker and was one of the first songs the band completed for the album. The song marries the raw energy and playfulness the band is known for with their present interest in creating intimately expressive music, both in its pensively poetic lyrics and surging melody. That sensibility carries over to “It’s Just Forever,” the final track the band laid down, which features guest vocals from The Kills’ Alison Mosshart. Mosshart’s yelping croon builds the intensity of the stomping number, an apt juxtaposition to the mid-tempo soulfulness of album standout “Hypocrite” and acoustic closer “Cigarette Daydreams.” Overall the album captures familiar sounds in a new way, balancing a nostalgic sonic aesthetic with a fresh, innovative sensibility and embodying a truly classic voice. MELOPHOBIA resonates with a sense of joyful abandon, which comes from facing those initial challenges head on.

“The more intensely we worked on it and the more we put it under a microscope, the more afraid we became of it,” Shultz adds. “Then we had to overcome that. Sometimes it’s not the most fun thing in the world and sometimes it’s jubilation. Immense joy. It was all about overcoming that fear of creating music under false pretense or with skewed intent.”

MELOPHOBIA follows Thank You, Happy Birthday, which debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard Top 200 and has sold over 250,000 copies to date. The album’s single, “Shake Me Down,” spent six weeks at No. 1 on Alternative radio, following Cage The Elephant’s 2009 breakout single “Ain’t No Rest For The Wicked,” which landed in the Top 5. Cage The Elephant has sold over 550,000 copies to date and spent 73 consecutive weeks on the Billboard Top 200. The band has toured extensively, selling out several headlining runs and performing alongside Black Keys, Foo Fighters, Queens of the Stone Age, Muse, Stone Temple Pilots and Silversun Pickups.

For Cage The Elephant, who originally hail from Bowling Green, KY, the aim is to always improve and evolve, ensuring that each subsequent release and tour represent a step forward. In that way MELOPHOBIA is not so much about a fear of music but a fear of not pushing music to its potential.

“You hope that you naturally evolve as a person and you’re able to apply the things that you’ve learned to your creative works,” Shultz says. “Sometimes you have to push yourself out of your comfort zone in order to keep yourself from getting into this place where you’re just dialing it in. That’s what we’re really afraid of.”

FIRST THURSDAY DEC. 4: INTERFAITH SANCTUARY HOUSE BAND IN-STORE PERFORMANCE, PLUS 30% OFF HOLIDAY CDs/VINYL AND ORNAMENTS!

first thursday facebookInterfaith-Sanctuary.-1.17.12Join us on First Thursday, Dec. 4 for a special in-store performance by the Interfaith Sanctuary House Band at 7 p.m.! Belinda Bowler will open. We’ll have a special raffle to benefit Interfaith Sanctuary at the event, which will be preceded by a Radio Boise on-air appearance by the house band and Interfaith Sanctuary team at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3. Full details below.

The Record Exchange also is offering First Thursday specials all day long, including 30% off holiday music (excluding Idaho Ho Ho benefit CDs) and ornaments, plus buy-two-get-one-free savings on used music/video (CDs, vinyl, cassettes, DVD, Blu-ray), espresso drinks and more!

The Interfaith Sanctuary House Band:

The Interfaith Sanctuary House Band is a group of men and women currently staying at the Interfaith Sanctuary shelter who have joined together to share their musical talents to create something beautiful for themselves and those who are lucky enough to hear them. With a rhythm section, guitars, and vocals, this group of talented musicians have chosen songs that express the joy and struggle of their lives. Their collaborative efforts and the restorative power of music make for a unique, heartfelt performance you won’t want to miss.

The Partnership:

The Musicians’ Fund of Boise, Boise Rock School and Interfaith Sanctuary have come together to bring music to the guests at Interfaith Sanctuary. Jared Goodpaster and Melody English from Boise Rock School provide musical equipment and instruction each week during Tuesday night band practices at the shelter. Belinda Bowler volunteers each week helping to work with the band, singers and music selections. Andy Lawless can be seen each week shooting video to capture the story of “The Building of the House Band.” Jodi Peterson, Interfaith Sanctuary’s PR & Marketing Consultant and Volunteer Executive Director of The Musicians’ Fund of Boise, proudly serves as the band manager.

The Radio Appearance:

The Interfaith Sanctuary House Band will perform live on Radio Boise at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 3. Jayne Sorrels, Interfaith Sanctuary’s Executive Director, Jodi Peterson and Jared Goodpaster will talk about the program, the shelter and the Dec. 4 in-store event at Record Exchange.

The Event:

The Interfaith Sanctuary House Band will perform a selection of songs from their repertoire following a solo acoustic set from Belinda Bowler. Music kicks off at 7 p.m.

Raffle tickets will be available for two front-row tickets to each night of the 9th Annual Xtreme Holiday Xtravaganza, hosted by Curtis Stigers and The Fool Squad and starring a cast of hundreds Dec. 21-23 at The Egyptian Theatre. Raffle tickets are $10 each. All proceeds to benefit Interfaith Sanctuary Homeless Shelter.

About Interfaith Sanctuary Housing Services:

Interfaith Sanctuary Housing Services is a collaboration of people of faith and people of conscience who have joined together to shelter and serve individuals experiencing homelessness. Sanctuary provides overnight shelter for men, women, and children and provides supportive services that promote greater self-sufficiency, improved well-being, and permanent housing acquisition. interfaithsanctuary.org

SALLIE FORD IN-STORE PERFORMANCE AND Q&A TUESDAY, NOV. 25 (ALL AGES)

1408483168Sallie Ford will perform live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.) at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages. Sallie Ford is performing at Neurolux for Radio Boise Tuesday later that evening and we have tickets for sale at the store!

A Q&A with Sallie and Boise Weekly music writer (and Record Exchange staffer) Ben Schultz will follow the performance!

ABOUT SALLIE FORD

sallie-ford-slap-backWhen Sallie Ford first burst into the music scene she quickly established herself as one of the most powerful voices in indie rock.  Her new album Slap Back was released on Oct. 14, marking her debut on Vanguard Records.  Produced by Chris Funk (Decemberists, Black Prairie, Red Fang), the new album introduces Sallie’s all-new line-up – Anita Lee Elliot (Viva Voce & Blue Giant) on bass, Amanda Spring (Point Juncture, WA) on drums & Cristina Cano (Albatross & Siren & the Sea) on keyboards.

Sallie Ford grew up playing music in Asheville, NC. In 2006, she decided to move to Portland, OR where she met her band The Sound Outside. Together they released three albums and an EP but parted ways in 2013.  The beginning of this year Sallie fulfilled her dream of starting an all-girl rock n’ roll band, and in February of 2014, the band went into the studio with producer Chris Funk to begin recording Slap Back.  The new record has a surf, garage rock & classic rock feel. Sallie proclaims Slap Back to be an “ode to all babe rockers from Joan Jett, Blondie and Pat Benatar to PJ Harvey & Exene Cervenka.”

Sallie Ford has performed on the Late Show with David Letterman and garnered critical acclaim from USA Today, NY Daily News, Boston Globe, Interview, Nylon, BUST, Paste and many more.

JOHN FULLBRIGHT IN-STORE TUESDAY, OCT. 21 (6PM) – OPENING FOR PATTY GRIFFIN AT THE EGYPTIAN THEATRE!

fullbright-muskogee-jun2014-1316-vfarmer-bw

Grammy-nominated Americana artist John Fullbright will perform live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.) at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 21. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages. Fullbright is opening for Patty Griffin at the Egyptian Theatre later that evening and we have tickets for sale at the store!

ABOUT JOHN FULLBRIGHT

“What’s so bad about happy?” John Fullbright sings on the openfullbrighting track of his new album, ‘Songs.’ It’s a play on the writer’s curse, the notion that new material can only come through heartbreak or depression, that great art is only born from suffering.

“A normal person, if they find themselves in a position of turmoil or grief, they’ll say, ‘I need to get out of this as fast as I can,’” says Fullbright. “A writer will say, ‘How long can I stay in this until I get something good?’ And that’s a bullshit way to look at life,” he laughs.

That plainspoken approach is part of what’s fueled the young Oklahoman’s remarkable rise. It was just two years ago that Fullbright released his debut studio album, ‘From The Ground Up’ to a swarm of critical acclaim. The LA Times called the record “preternaturally self-assured,” while NPR hailed him as one of the 10 Artists You Should Have Known in 2012, saying “it’s not every day a new artist…earns comparisons to great songwriters like Townes Van Zandt and Randy Newman, but Fullbright’s music makes sense in such lofty company.” The Wall Street Journal crowned him as giving one of the year’s 10 best live performances, and the album also earned him the ASCAP Foundation’s Harold Adamson Lyric Award. If there was any doubt that his debut announced the arrival of a songwriting force to be reckoned with, it was put to rest when ‘From The Ground Up’ was nominated for Best Americana Album at the GRAMMY Awards, which placed Fullbright alongside some of the genre’s most iconic figures, including Bonnie Raitt.

“I never came into this with a whole lot of expectations,” says Fullbright. “I just wanted to write really good songs, and with that outlook, everything else is a perk. The fact that we went to LA and played “Gawd Above” in front of a star-studded audience [at the GRAMMY pre-tel concert], never in my life would I have imagined that.”

But for Fullbright, it hasn’t been all the acclaim that means the most to him, but rather his entrance into a community of songwriters whose work he admires.

“When I started out, I was all by myself in a little town in Oklahoma where whatever you wanted, you just made it yourself,” he explains. “I didn’t grow up around musicians or like-minded songwriters, but I grew up around records. One of the most fulfilling things about the last two years is that now I’m surrounded by like-minded people in a community of peers. You don’t feel so alone anymore.”

If there’s a recurring motif that jumps out upon first listen to ‘Songs,’ it’s the act of writing, which is one Fullbright treats with the utmost respect. “When I discovered Townes Van Zandt, that’s when I went, ‘You know, this is something to be taken pretty damn seriously,’” says Fullbright. “‘This is nothing to do with business, it has to do with art and identity.’ You can write something that’s going to outlast you, and immortality though song is a big draw.”

But just as important to Fullbright as writing is careful editing. “I can write a first verse and a chorus fairly easily, and it’s important just to document it at the time and come back to it later,” he explains. “That’s the labor, when you really get your tools out and figure out how to craft something that’s worthwhile.”

Fullbright inhabits his songs’ narrators completely, his old-soul voice fleshing out complex characters and subtle narratives with a gifted sense of understatement.

“My songwriting is a lot more economical now,” he explains. “I like to say as much as I can in 2 minutes 50 seconds, and that’s kind of a point of pride for me.”

The arrangements on ‘Songs’ are stripped down to their cores and free of ornamentation. Fullbright’s guitar and piano anchor the record, while a minimalist rhythm section weaves in and out throughout the album. That’s not to say these are simple songs; Fullbright possesses a keen ear for memorable melody and a unique approach to harmony, moving through chord progressions far outside the expected confines of traditional folk or Americana. The performances are stark and direct, though, a deliberate approach meant to deliver the songs in their purest and most honest form.

“I’m a better performer and writer and musician now, and I wanted a record that would reflect that,” he says. “We tracked a lot of it live, just me and a bass player in a room with a few microphones. The basis is a live performance and everything else supports that. I think you just get as much energy and skill as you can into a take, and then start building from there. And what we found is that you don’t have to add too much to that.”

The songs also reflect how drastically Fullbright’s life has changed since the release of ‘From The Ground Up,’ which launched him into a rigorous schedule of international touring. “Going Home” finds him appreciating the simple pleasure of heading back to Oklahoma, which he likens to The Odyssey. “When you’re gone for so long, once you know you’re headed in the right direction to your own bed and your own home, that’s one of the greatest feelings you can have,” he says.

“I Didn’t Know” is a song he premiered live at concert hosted by Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell, a story he tells still somewhat incredulously, while “When You’re Here” is a somber piano love song, and “The One That Lives Too Far’ is a raw account of the strain that distance can put on a romantic relationship. “All That You Know,” which features just voice and Wurlitzer, implores listeners to appreciate what’s right in front of them, and the finger-picked “Keeping Hope Alive” is a song of resilience through hard times.

To be sure, ‘Songs’ has its moments of darkness, tracks born from pain and heartbreak, but for a craftsman like Fullbright, there are few greater joys than carving emotion into music, taking a stab at that lofty goal of immortality through song. It makes him—and his fans—happy, and there’s nothing bad about that.