record exchange boise
The Record Exchange - Culture Spot

[ Search Store ]

Include Tracks

[ save the boise hive! ]

save the boise hive!

Boise Hive is in danger of losing its building, and we're looking to you to help The Record Exchange help #SavetheBoiseHive.

The non-profit musicians resource center has until Oct. 10 to raise $75,000 to match an offer on the building it's currently leasing and occupying. Boise Hive has invested significant time and money into the space and hopes to avoid relocating. A GoFundMe page has been set up HERE; you also can donate in person at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, ID 83702).


[ treefort music fest ]


The Record Exchange is a proud sponsor of the fifth annual Treefort Music Fest, taking place March 23-27 throughout Downtown Boise. Treefort 2016 5-day passes go on sale Saturday, Sept. 12, including a special "locals-only" pass price of $119 for one day only at The Record Exchange!


[ rx amazon store ]

rx amazon store

Visit The Record Exchange's Amazon Marketplace store to shop for rare and discount CDs, vinyl, DVDs and books. Live in Boise? Order online and arrange for in-store pickup!


[ RSD leftovers/restocks ]

RSD leftovers/restocks

Record Store Day is over, but The Record Exchange still has dozens of titles still available, plus limited restocks and a few late arrivals.


[ pono is here! ]

pono is here!

Pono is here! The Record Exchange is now carrying the PonoPlayer, a high-resolution digital music player created with the intent of providing a higher quality digital listening experience.


[ payette brewing company ]

Basic CMYK

The Record Exchange is a proud partner with Boise's Payette Brewing Company! Enjoy Payette Brewing Company beer (and for free!) at Record Exchange events such as Record Store Day, the annual holiday Bonus Club Sale and our singer-songwriter Birthday Bash celebrations!


[ outside the heard ]

[ rx top 10 ]

rx top 10

1. Savage Hills Ballroom
Youth Lagoon
2. B’lieve I’m Goin Down
Kurt Vile
3. Every Open Eye
4. Dodge the Burn
The Dead Weather
5. Cass County
Don Henley
6. Servant of Love
Patty Griffin
7. Better Nature
Silversun Pickups
8. Depression Cherry
Beach House
9. Rattle That Lock
David Gilmour
Lana Del Rey

[ idaho horror film festival ]

idaho horror film festival

The Record Exchange is a proud sponsor of the second annual Idaho Horror Film Festival, taking place Oct. 15-18 throughout Downtown Boise! Join us on Oct. 15 for a special event at the RX featuring our own Rachel Prin DJing two hours of horror film soundtracks on vinyl, plus free Payette Brewing Co. beer!


[ 2014 staff picks ]

2014 staff picks

After weeks of scrutiny, Record Exchange staffers have completed their 2014 Top 10 lists, and leading up to Christmas we will be posting individual lists here on the website. Visit the store to view the lists in realtime and shop our special '14 Staff Picks display. Let the judgment begin!


[ sell us your stuff! ]

sell us your stuff!

The Record Exchange buys and trades used CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray discs and vinyl in good condition Monday-Saturday until 9 p.m. and Sunday until 6 p.m.


[ go listen boise ]

go listen boise

Go Listen Boise is a non-profit, all-volunteer organization with the mission of fostering a vibrant and diverse musical culture in the Boise area.


[ countdown to rsd ]



vance joy94.9 FM The River presents Vance Joy live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.) at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 19. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages. This is Vance’s only show in town!


vance joy epVance Joy’s debut EP God Loves You When You’re Dancing worms its way under your skin. It’s not an easy task to produce a record so evocative, yet so stripped-back; simplicity in art is often a challenging feat. For Melbourne-based singer and songwriter Vance Joy, the songs began as a collection of loose threads, which over time naturally weaved together, like they were always meant to find a life of their own.

Like the unforced orchestration of his songs, Vance Joy’s recent success developed organically. Earning his chops on Melbourne’s open mic circuit, he tested out new material at venues like the iconic Great Britain Hotel in Richmond. Naturally, his music attracted fans, press and label interest. Before long, the musician played sold out Australian tours and penned a deal with Liberation Music in Australia, Atlantic Records for the rest of the world, and Infectious Music for the UK. He’s supported Of Monsters and Men, Julia Stone, Bernard Fanning locally, Lissie & Tom Odell across the USA, and headlined sold out Canada & UK shows.

Vance Joy’s love of music was inspired by his mother’s aptitude at literature and his father’s fondness of singing.  His parents’ vast, eclectic record collection only served to heighten his partiality to it – while he was growing up he would listen to everything from The Pogues to Paul Kelly.  After completing a university degree in law, he decided to take a year’s break to focus on making music. He traveled to India and South-East Asia with a collection of songs rattling around in his head.  When he came home, they all fell into place. “I’m learning subtleties in my voice, understanding what I sound like and trying to embrace who I am,” he intimates. “It wasn’t rushed song writing at all.”

The production process for God Loves You When You’re Dancing was any artist’s dream. For just one week Vance Joy holed up with producer John Castle (Lior, The Drones) in The Shed Studios with Ed White on percussion and cello. “It was spontaneous,” Vance Joy says. “John’s style is very instinctive, and that felt really good for me. I’d have an idea, and he’d just say ‘let’s do it’. For us, the whole process felt right.”

The EP opens with the lilting ‘Emmylou’, a lullaby with a subtle streak of darkness. “The keyboard and harmonium give the song tension; a sense of pensiveness,” Vance Joy says. “The best lullabies are gentle and tender but also hint at the real world outside.” The striking element in this song is the delicate guitar, which Vance Joy wanted to sound like “rolling, pulsing momentum. Like a Bruce Springsteen song”. ‘Riptide’, the EP’s second track, gives the record a rhythmic texture, highlighting his raw, stripped-back song writing.

“I was house-sitting this awesome mansion in Camberwell which had a piano,” he says, referring to ‘Play With Fire’. “I wrote this song on that piano. It’s really just the same chords over, and over. It’s not a complicated song at all, and that’s why I like it.’’ The song, similar to Tom Petty’s simple yet powerfully expressive song structures, was written with as much delicacy as ease for Vance Joy. “That song just wrote itself.” 

‘Snaggletooth’, the EP’s second-last track plucks at the heartstrings with every strum of Vance Joy’s ukulele. His lyrics are beautifully put, with lines including “when she sings, the heavens part”. He explains that the song is about embracing the imperfections in the people you love. Just as you thought Vance Joy couldn’t take hold of your emotional core any further, ‘From Afar’ wallops you in the chest. ‘From Afar’, the latest single off the EP, tells the story of romance, friendship or life-long camaraderie gone awry.

God Loves You When You’re Dancing comes from an artist who finds beauty in darkness, and power in simplicity.


tennisTennis will perform live at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St., Downtown Boise) at 3 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 4. The in-store is presented by Boise Weekly. Tennis is playing Neurolux later that evening and we have tickets for sale here at the store. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages!


tennisCelebrated Denver-based husband and wife duo Tennis will continue to tour to support their new EP Small Sound with a run of dates in January on the West Coast. The new EP, which is out now, is the bands first collaboration with Communion Records.

Small Sound follows their much lauded previous full length efforts, 2011’s Cape Dory and 2012’s Young and Old. Four of the tracks were produced by Richard Swift (Foxygen, The Shins, The Mynabirds) with the fifth track “Cured of Youth” produced by Jim Eno (Spoon, Polica, Gayngs). The band inked a new deal with Communion Records and will return to the studio to work on new music for a Spring 2014 full length album. Small Sound is available as a limited 10” vinyl release and CD. Noisey recently premiered their lyric video for the song “Mean Streets,” which can be viewed HERE and shared HERE.

Tennis was born aboard Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley’s nearly seven-month sailing trip. Upon returning home, the duo began writing music together as a way to document the history of their shared experience. The result was Cape Dory, an intimate and concise recollection of life on a 30-foot sloop.

Moore and Riley followed Cape Dory with Young and Old, which The New York Times called “striking indie-pop” and The New Yorker described as “winsome as it is ebullient.” The album debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Heatseeker Chart, #1 on CMJ Top 200, where it remained for three weeks in a row and debuted on Soundscan’s “New Artist Chart” at #1, remaining there for nine consecutive weeks. The band performed on “The Late Show with David Letterman,” “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” “Conan” and “Last Call with Carson Daly.”


482453_435742833194675_1441088126_nIt’s First Thursday and December, so to celebrate the season we’ll have roaming buskers from the 2013 Idaho Ho Ho CD performing inside the store (6-8pm), not to mention a host of holiday savings:

• Buy 2 get 1 free used CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray and vinyl!
• Buy 2 get 1 espresso drinks!
• Free drip coffee, hot cocoa and fountain soda 5-9 pm!
60 $9.99 Give the Gift of Music CDs!
13 of ’13 vinyl LP sale!
Black Friday exclusive releases!

Once again, Moxie Java and Idaho musicians have combined efforts to support the Idaho Foodbank with the fourth volume of IdaHo Ho Ho with Moxie Java, another holiday celebration with music from 12 Idaho artists.

The limited-edition CD is available at the Record Exchange and participating Moxie Java locations throughout the Treasure Valley for $15, with all profits going directly to help fund the efforts of the Idaho Foodbank – the largest distributor of free emergency food in the state. Since 1984, the Idaho Foodbank has provided 100 million pounds of food to a network of more than 200 hunger-relief partners.


1. John Nemeth – “Merry Christmas Baby”
2. Curtis Stigers – “Early On One Christmas Morn”
3. Eilen Jewell – “Christmas Time’s A-Comin’ To Heck with Old Santa Claus”
4. Ned Evett – “Broken Christmas Eve”
5. Edmond Dantes – “Hanging Memories”
6. Calico – “Our Home”
7. Nate Fowler – “Jingle Bells”
8. Kate Comstock – “O Holy Night”
9. Johnny Shoes – “C’mon Christmas”
10. Kayleigh Jack – “Your Holiday Cheer”
11. Reilly Coyote – “I Wanna Wassail With You”
12. Belinda Bowler – “Christmas in the Trenches”

On Facebook:


dawes94.9 FM The River and Boise Weekly present a special acoustic set by Dawes at The Record Exchange (1105 W. Idaho St.) at 6:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 1. The band will perform a short acoustic set on The Record Exchange stage followed by a Q&A moderated by The River’s Tim Johnstone and album signing. As always, this Record Exchange in-store event is free and all ages. Dawes is performing at Knitting Factory later that evening and we have tickets for sale at the store!

Want guaranteed admission to the event? Purchase any Dawes title on CD or vinyl and we’ll give you a wristband guaranteeing admission plus a custom Dawes lithograph (while supplies last) — the first 10 people also get a free ticket to the Knitting Factory show! Listen to The River prior to the event for a chance to win a wristband/litho combo!


While the city of Los Angeles has been both an inspiration and a home to the four members of Dawes, they found themselves traveling East last fall to record their third album in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina with newly enlisted producer Jacquire King.  It was a chance to hunker down and work each day for a month away from familiar landmarks and routines. The tracks they laid down at Asheville’s Echo Mountain Studio have yielded a 12-song disc of tremendous sonic and narrative clarity, book-ended in classic album fashion by two very different versions of the wistful  “Just Beneath The Surface” – a misleading title, really, since the songs stacked in between dig so deep. Stories Don’t End is not so much a departure from the quartet’s previous efforts as a distillation of them. It spotlights the group’s maturing skills as arrangers, performers and interpreters who shape the raw material supplied by chief songwriter and lead vocalist Taylor Goldsmith into an artfully concise and increasingly soulful sound.

Once again, Goldsmith displays a particular gift for tunes that balance tough and tender, hardboiled and heartbroken. As a writer, he prowls his psyche like a forties detective, looking for clues to the mysteries of life and love.  “Just My Luck” has the irresistible pull of a vintage country tune, though the arrangement is understated and contemporary. If Goldsmith’s vocal delivery weren’t plaintive enough, the band ups the emotional ante with a beautiful wordless coda that intertwines Tay Strathairn’s piano and Goldsmith’s lead guitar. Similarly “Something In Common” is a morning-after shuffle that builds into a bigger and more dramatic track before dropping back to a quiet melancholic finish. Goldsmith takes a few simple words, like “something in common,” and uses them like chapter headings to develop a compelling story, full of unexpected twists, from verse to verse. “Someone Will” includes the same kind of word play while boasting a little more swagger. “Hey Lover,” a cover of a tongue-in-cheek tune by Dawes’ good buddy Blake Mills, is a playful mid-album break with Taylor Goldsmith and his young brother, drummer Griffin Goldsmith, trading off lead vocals.

Before he started composing for the album, says Taylor, “I went through a Joan Didion tear.” It was right after he read the legendary author’s Democracy that he found the title, Stories Don’t End, in her work. Though Didion is currently a New Yorker, she is most associated with Southern California, its culture of the sixties and seventies, a subject she examined in gimlet-eyed prose. When Goldsmith started penning new songs after several months on the road in support of Dawes’ 2011 disc, Nothing Is Wrong, his writing was even more keenly observant. “From a Window Seat” was the first he completed and, he admits, “It’s a very singular song. A lot of the songs on the record can be a little more broad, about a period in someone’s life or trying to explore a certain feeling. This song is about a specific experience of being on an airplane and that’s not a very poetic or lyrical idea.” Yet Goldsmith, employing an accumulation of small details, once again finds the bigger picture, about the narrator’s past and his (and our) uncertain future, about the history lurking beneath the swimming pool-dotted landscape below him. Just as important is the track itself — lean, propulsive and guitar-driven – lending urgency to Goldsmith’s in-flight musings. Similarly, “Bear Witness,” a last-minute addition to the lineup that the band arranged during the Asheville sessions, is an almost cinematically vivid rendering of a man having a conversation with his child from his hospital bed.

Nothing Is Wrong had garnered considerable acclaim, with London’s Independent declaring, “It’s as close to a perfect Americana album as there’s been this year.”  Up to then, the band had relied on good friend Jonathan Wilson as producer, cutting its 2009 debut disc, North Hills, at Wilson’s Laurel Canyon studio and its follow-up with Wilson at a larger room in Echo Park. But Wilson’s own career as a solo artist was taking off following the release of his Gentle Spirit disc, and the band began a search for a new collaborator.  King boasted an impressive and unusual resume, having produced an eclectic range of artists, including Kings of Leon, Modest Mouse, Norah Jones and the Punch Brothers. Says keyboardist Strathairn, “He’s really easy to work with. As a producer he doesn’t want to be the artist, he simply tries to make the band sound the best that the band can be. And the work speaks for itself.”

Recording with King and foregoing the quickly cut, straight-to-analog tape approach of its first two recordings was a way, says Taylor, for Dawes “to push the boundaries of what might be expected of us, or feel like a comfort zone for us, while trying to be the same band we always are. That was important to us. We didn’t want to abandon anybody’s sense of who we were and, more importantly, our sense of ourselves. We wanted to stay true to this thing that we had while starting to widen the spectrum a little bit.”

The reprise of “Just Beneath the Surface” at the end of the disc, however, is a first-take document of the band figuring out the tune together, and it was too good not to keep. As bassist Wylie Gelber recalls, “We knew the vibe we were going for and we were running through it while Jacquire was setting up. But we were completely unaware that he was recording us. We were fooling around and towards the end of it, we stopped for a minute and Jacquire said, Hey man, I think we’ve got it. We tried to beat that take but we couldn’t. You can hear it there, you can feel that it’s the first time it’s being played, it’s a simple song and there’s a subtle art to doing it. It ebbs and flows.”

“With Jacquire,” explains Taylor, “we were able to hold on to an essence of what we had been, but I feel now, more than with our first two records, that this makes a case that we’re a band from 2013. There a lot of bands that harken back to a period or style of a different time and that can be really limiting. That was never our intention.”